INCENTIVE BASED POPULATING MODEL OF NEW SATELLITE TOWNS – ITS IMPACT ON TRANSPORTATION

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Abstract Summary
Satellite Townships is the latest trend of town planning. In almost every metropolis globally, whenever the pressure of population and employment has increased, planners have come up with satellite townships. The Wikipedia definition of a Satellite Town is; “A satellite town or satellite city is a concept in urban planning that refers essentially to smaller metropolitan areas which are located somewhat near to, but are mostly independent of larger metropolitan areas”. So far planning of Satellite Townships is concerned, across the globe, they are planned as separate towns which will fundamentally, or administratively be dependent on the main city but will remain independent for the daily commute of the residents. Execution of this philosophy has vastly failed. A sample sentence while searching for Satellite Town in Oxford dictionary says; “Not least of the problems is the fact that more and more of those who are employed in Dublin are being forced to live in satellite towns and commute forty or fifty miles or more to work.” This indeed says that the problem is not confined to India. Be it Gurgaon, Noida, Faridabad, Navi Mumbai, Thane or Salt Lake, none have successfully grown up as independent Cities. Even though land uses are planned for independent towns, almost in all cases, the satellites are acting either as the place of residence for ones working in the main city or vice versa. Newtown is a similar Satellite Township near the city of Kolkata in the state of West Bengal in India. In the last 10 years, Newtown has seen a huge increase in investment and growth. Whereas large parts of the CBD & Sub CBDs are developed, proportionate residential units have not come up. While commercial development has happened extremely fast and huge employment opportunity has been generated, a proportionate amount of shelter has not been created. Moreover, the cost of developing a Greenfield site is also added to the cost of housing making it less affordable. This has already forced many people, employed in Newtown, to accommodate themselves to distant areas. This is causing people to commute long distance daily, making roads leading to Newtown congested. During the peak hours, all roads connecting Newtown & Kolkata are getting stalled due to heavy traffic. The situation is already alarming when Newtown has not even reached half of its population & employment capacity. Employees in Newtown are, on an average, travelling more than 30 kilometres daily to go to the office and come back. Affordability is the primary reason for them not to shift to Newtown. Almost the entire public investment is being done to create or increase the supply of transport however the actions to reduce the need for transport is largely neglected. It is understood that the distance between home and office is the primary cause of traffic bottleneck in almost all roads in the city. Reducing the need for transport will require no maintenance cost and will end the never-ending cycle of demand-supply gap. In this report, taking Newtown as a Case Study Area, it is tried to explore a method of shifting people close to their place of work. If the majority of employees reside in the vicinity of their offices, transport problems can be reduced hugely since work trips constitute the largest share in total trips. ‘Incentive Based Populating Model’ is one such method where incentive & facilities to employees for residing close to their house can have much higher economic and financial return than spending the same money in capital expenditure of creating infrastructure for transport.
Abstract ID :
ISO10
Submission Type
Assistant Planner
,
Kolkata Metropolitan Development Authority

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