Mitigating adverse impacts of forced evictions and supporting participatory governance: Case of Evictions around Empress Market, Karachi

This abstract has open access
Abstract Summary
Saddar Cantonment is the historic center of Karachi, possessing culturally rich and vibrant landscapes, where Empress Market (A British Colonial market from early 19th century) sets the backdrop for the small scale entrepreneurs who act as the living character of the environment. The area also acts as the transit hub for the city, as it connects the northern part of the city to the southern end, and a large number of people commute via Saddar Cantonment on a daily basis. Due to the concentration of transit passengers in the area, there are many small scale commercial and retail setups around Empress Market which operate informally, but add dynamism and rich character to the vicinity. Because of the informal nature of these setups, they regularly face evictions. One similar wave of evictions was initiated in September 2018, as a result of which the commercial and retail setups in and around the Empress Market were removed. This process drastically changed the nature of the Market, and impacted adversely on the living culture of Saddar Cantonment, making the small scale entrepreneurs enter survival mode. These evictions resulted in loss of social diversity and economic potential of the Market, and changed the character of the area overnight, and were resisted heavily by the local representatives of these entrepreneurs and the civil society. The central argument presented in this research is that this social and economic loss could have been avoided if the evictees were better informed and prepared. The central stance is that the government should have had a consultative and participatory approach, where alternate places for relocation should have been allocated to the small scale entrepreneurs before eviction and the option of vacating the area voluntarily should have been explored. This would have also leaded to similar results, but in a more amicable manner. The nature of urban resilience in these circumstances would have drastically changed. The paper uses a case based approach, where the evictions around the Empress Market have been taken as a case and information is gathered through qualitative interviews of people evicted, regular visitors to the market, civil society representatives and members of community based organizations.
Abstract ID :
ISO148
Submission Type
Lecturer
,
NED University of Engineering and Technology

Similar Abstracts by Type

Abstract ID
Abstract Title
Abstract Topic
Submission Type
Primary Author
ISO540
1: Limitless cities and urban futures: planning for scale
Paper
Wala Bashari
ISO247
4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for culture
Paper
han zou
ISO183
1: Limitless cities and urban futures: planning for scale
Paper
Kangwei Tu
ISO118
2: Beside the megacity and the role of other cities and areas: planning for balance
Paper
Sunny Bansal
ISO398
2: Beside the megacity and the role of other cities and areas: planning for balance
Paper
Asher Yang
ISO473
5: Smart futures and sustainability: planning for innovation
Paper
Swechcha Roy
ISO80
5: Smart futures and sustainability: planning for innovation
Paper
Cynthia Goytia
ISO541
5: Smart futures and sustainability: planning for innovation
Paper
Hanna Obracht-Prondzyńska
ISO215
3: Liveable places and healthy cities: planning for people
Paper
Jingwei LI
35 hits