Changes in Shanghai City Centers from the Perspective of Global City Region Based on Mobile Phone Signaling Data

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Abstract Summary
As large cities’ hinterlands keep expanding, Shanghai and its neighboring regions are important regions of coordination for Shanghai to realize the goal of becoming a global city. Like other metropolises, Shanghai would inevitably move towards a development path featuring polycentric urban region. Over the years, the planning of Shanghai’s city center system has been based on central place theory and it is a service level-oriented hierarchical system. From a regional perspective, this paper will explore changes that have taken place in the service client and service scope in city center system from 2011 to 2018. First, mobile phone signaling data collected in 2011 and 2018 are used to identify residence- recreation behaviors. Mobile phone users’ data in terms of length of stay and activity time are used to distinguish short-stay visitors from local residents. Moreover, the number of repetitions at the same location at a specific time is used to calculate local resident users’ place of residence, work place, and all users’ location of daily recreation. It is identified through mobile phone signaling data that users who stay for over 30 minutes per day in the center scope are visiting the center for recreation and business purposes. Second, the numbers of local residents’ visit to the center and to different levels of centers within two months are calculated. Then the actual service scope is identified based on the local residence of 70% of the residents who pay visits to different levels of centers and a comparison would be made as to the change of actual service scope between 2011 and 2018. In the end, calculation would be made as to how recreation behaviors relate to business behaviors by short-stay visitors to the city center. The results show that the service client of city centers at all levels have clearly differentiated. 12%-32% short-stay visitors go to Shanghai’s high-level city centers on weekends, and the figure rises to 24%-50% on holidays and festivals. More than half of the short-stay visitors come from Jiangsu, Zhejiang and Anhui provinces. Currently, Shanghai has already assumed the Yangtze River Delta and even the whole world’s service functions. Looking forward, it will represent the main image of Shanghai and assume the core functions of a global city. Meanwhile, the proportion of the number of visits made by local residents to the three centers at the same time has dropped from 21% to 4%. Local residents’ hierarchical demand for center is shrinking and flattening. The changes in the actual service scope of the sub-centers and different centers of regional centers tend to converge, and there are less differentiated service features provided by different levels of centers, which means the service levels have the propensity to be identical. It follows that from a regional perspective, as China’s megacity, Shanghai’s city centers do not completely conform to the features of a center system described in the original central place theory. Therefore, it is proposed to transform Shanghai civic center system from service level orientation to service client orientation and construct a service client oriented civic center system. Among them, the service client of the second level center should mainly focus on the Shanghai metropolitan area, and when it comes to function, the employment function of producer services and business service functions must be combined so that Shanghai metropolitan areas are able to develop harmoniously with mutual coordination.
Abstract ID :
ISO201
Submission Type
Tongji university, College of architecture and urban planning
Tongji University

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