Defining Transportation Happiness : A Contribution for Metropolitan Transport Planning Policy

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Abstract Summary
Happiness is a subjective feeling relative to objective happiness, which depends on outward things to produce happiness. The interpretation of happiness relates to multiple subjects such as philosophy, psychology, sociology, and economics. .The term happiness or well-being sometimes used synonymously. The happiness or well-being resides within the experience of the individual. Transportation as an important element for urban sustainability has been well known. Although the lay understanding of sustainability generally focuses on environmental domain, more largely sustainability is contained of three aspects: environmental, economic and social sustainability. Individual and societal well- being are critical indicators of social sustainability, however, little attention from research and policy has been paid to the impacts of transportation on well-being. Travel satisfaction refers to people’s evaluation of transport services and their experience during travel. Travel and the characteristics of the journey could influence well-being positively and negatively, directly and indirectly. Transportation Happiness is the idea that the experience of travel is a critical element to the success of a mode — public or private, motorized or nonmotorized — in an increasingly competitive mobility market and people should have a good user experience, regardless of how they travel. With extensive urban expansion resulting from rapid urbanization, commuting has become a physical and mental burden for many residents in the metropolitan of Indonesia because of the increasing travel distances and worsening travel experiences, significantly influencing their well-being. The studies of happiness or well-being has emerged since 1950s, however researches on transportation happiness just recently started. Moreover many of the researches carried out in developed countries. Nevertheless, such researches on developing countries are still limited. Do they bring a similar conclusion? Bandung, with more than 7 million residents, is the third largest metropolitan area in Indonesia, and covers 2 cities and 3 districts. The city of Bandung is the capital of the province of West Java. Located about 180 km from the city of Jakarta, the capital of this country. The imbalance between inadequate transportation infrastructure supply and increasing motorization, which reached 16% per year in Bandung City, is one of the main causes of congestion in the city of Bandung, like other major cities in Indonesia. This is also compounded by the unavailability of reliable public transportation. The aim of this paper is to contribute to better informed and targeted spatial and mobility management policies in metropolitan areas. Understanding the causes and correlates of travel satisfaction is important not only for transport companies to improve transport services, but also for governments and policy makers to incorporate well-being into their public policies. Using Bandung Metropolitan Area (BMA) as the case study, this paper tries to identify the level of transportation happiness in Bandung. Here household survey data are used as the basis for analysis, together with additional, complementary data taken from authority datasets. The analysis will use quantitative methods.
Abstract ID :
ISO520
Submission Type
Institut Teknologi Nasional, Bandung

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