How Socio-economic Shapes Urban Morphology in Jakarta’s Informal Settlement: A Case Study of Taman Sari and Manggarai

This abstract has open access
Abstract Summary
Jakarta is the second largest contiguous urban area in the world, which inhabited by more than 30 million people in its metropolitan area (Demographia, 2015). Although Jakarta has played its role as an economic engine within the region, economic disparity and informality have frightened its success. Discussing informal settlement in Jakarta cannot be separated with its urban village, or locally known as kampungs. The existence of kampungs can be traced back from the colonial age when Jakarta had segregated into the planned settlement (bebouwde kom) and unplanned settlement (niet bebouwde kom). In 1950, just after Indonesian gained its independence and the planning institution did not exist, Jakarta experienced rapid urbanization, which impacted a massive sprout of the informal settlement called kampung. Nowadays, kampung tends to be more heterogeneous, where many inhabitants with different ethnicity, educations, jobs and income-level living together. However, the morphology of kampungs remains the same, which characterize by its informal pattern and high density. Several studies have discussed the kampungs in Jakarta. However, the studies investigate the factors shaping kampungs in Jakarta is limited. This paper aims to identify factors that shape kampung development in Jakarta based on socio-economic aspects. We studied two different kampungs in Jakarta, which are Taman Sari and Manggarai. In the past, Taman Sari was designed as well-developed residential areas, whereas Manggarai was a place for low-skilled labour from Manggarai, a small town in East Nusa Tenggara Province, which made this area called Manggarai. We found that economic levels and ethnicity show a substantial relationship in shaping kampungs’ morphology. Most of Taman Sari inhabitant originally comes as a trader from China, Arab, and India since its location is geographically located near the seaport. Meanwhile, Manggarai is inhabited by a more diverse community, and its predominately by working class works in different areas in Jakarta since it located strategically in the city core and the existence of a Manggarai central station.
Abstract ID :
ISO636
Submission Type
Architect
,
PT. Digital Registrasi Indonesia
Architect
,
PT Digital Registrasi Indonesia
Architect
,
PT Digital Registrasi Indonesia
GIS Expert and Urban Planner
,
PT Digital Registrasi Indonesia

Similar Abstracts by Type

Abstract ID
Abstract Title
Abstract Topic
Submission Type
Primary Author
ISO540
1: Limitless cities and urban futures: planning for scale
Paper
Wala Bashari
ISO247
4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for culture
Paper
han zou
ISO183
1: Limitless cities and urban futures: planning for scale
Paper
Kangwei Tu
ISO118
2: Beside the megacity and the role of other cities and areas: planning for balance
Paper
Sunny Bansal
ISO398
2: Beside the megacity and the role of other cities and areas: planning for balance
Paper
Asher Yang
ISO473
5: Smart futures and sustainability: planning for innovation
Paper
Swechcha Roy
ISO80
5: Smart futures and sustainability: planning for innovation
Paper
Cynthia Goytia
ISO541
5: Smart futures and sustainability: planning for innovation
Paper
Hanna Obracht-Prondzyńska
ISO215
3: Liveable places and healthy cities: planning for people
Paper
Jingwei LI