Presenting the prospects for Ropeway Implementation as a Public Transport Mode, the case of Moscow

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Abstract Summary
The issue of how modern cities are organized and developed is one of the most pressing nowadays. Indeed, the share of urban population in the world has been already above 54%, whereas by 2050 the percentage tend to be around 66%. Currently about 74% of Russian population lives in cities, and by 2050 this figure should exceed 80% (UN, 2018). At the same time, Moscow population in 2018 was estimated in about 12.5 million inhabitants (Rosstat, 2018). The importance of competent transport planning in such a city as Moscow is without any doubt. In fact, the capital of Russia carries the legacy of the USSR era, exposed in its’ morphology and road network configuration: the mono-functionality of peripheral areas with a predominance of residential uses, while the proportion of the built-up area of the city allocated for streets and roads on the outskirts does not reach 10% (Blinkin, 2018). While it is clear that a permanent increase in the share of streets and roads in such circumstances would not be economically justified, Moscow tend to solve the accessibility challenge in various ways: one of them is the development of public transport system, its attractiveness. In terms of utility, the attractiveness of public transport for an individual is a function of time spent on the journey. Thus, the maximum level of utility is achieved by minimizing the duration of time travelled. Obviously one’s attitude to public transport as an alternative to a personal vehicle is rather impossible to interpret. However, it can be argued that the more choices and the higher the average speed of public transit are provided to the population, the greater is the probability of its attractiveness among citizens. Fundamentally, the decision of a public transport mode on the section from point A to point B is based on various parameters, one of the keys when making such decisions is transport demand - in other words, the number of passengers moving daily from one location to another. Generally, classic urban transport modes (bus, tram, subway, etc.) are used for such objectives, depending on their carrying capacity. However, for urban planners there are much more restrictions like commissioning costs, operating expenses, existing settlement, and others. Hence, in some cases, standard urban transport planning tools cannot efficiently solve immediate problems, and solutions, previously considered narrowly applicable, may prove to be complementary to the tasks of a modern city development, complementing the public transport network and helping to solve a certain urgent challenges range. In this paper, Moscow is considered as an example of a dynamically developing city with high intraday passenger traffic and typical post-Soviet cities’ issues (see above). In the context of its’ specifics, namely the low connectivity level, implementation of aerial cableways as an element of Moscow’s public transport system is proposed, foremost, to increase the accessibility of neighborhoods. The object of the research is aerial cableway passenger systems, while the subject is the possibility of expanding the typological spectrum of urban passenger transport due to the implementation of the aerial ropeways as a type of public transport on the example of Moscow. Basic hypothesis suggests the need to establish direct transport links between isolated areas of the city of Moscow, while the solution could be met by incorporating modern aerial ropeways into urban transport systems. Thus, the purpose is to propose an evaluation methodology corresponding to connectivity estimates of Moscow districts. The results of the analysis show for which areas of the city implementation of aerial cableways as an element of the public transport system is appropriate and valid.
Abstract ID :
ISO640
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Associated Sessions

En
,
National Research University Higher School of Economics – Institute for Transport Economics and Transport Policy Studies, Centre for Transport Modelling (itetps.hse.ru)

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