Creative Space as Leverage: The Making of Innovative Cities in Indonesia

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Abstract Summary
Last year, the government of Indonesia launched ‘Making Indonesia 4.0’ roadmap to enter the ten biggest world economy by 2030. The roadmap aims to leverage the booming of 4th industrial revolution and the demographic bonus of the country, where small-medium-enterprise and digital infrastructure will be supported. The term smart city then suddenly became a jargon for every city in need of redevelopment, just like the term of heritage preservation and green utilized before. But what it actually means for cities in Indonesia to be a smart city? This paper aims to investigate the ‘smartness’ of a city in Indonesian context, through case studies and disseminating the role of growing creative spaces in Indonesia. The making of smart city often identified by top-down comprehensive plan. In the west, the effort of making a smart city is often leading to the establishment of ‘Innovation District’ in the late 1990s. 22@ in Barcelona, Spain, became one of the first official innovation district, with new land use regulations and special zoning initiated by the municipality to attract information and telecommunication technologies industries. In Asia, Jurong Innovation District in Singapore is also proposed for similar goal, supported by the government of Singapore, it promises to redevelop the manufacturing belt with research and development so it can thrive in the 4.0 global challenge. Meanwhile, in Indonesian context, there is rarely any long term plan that direct city to grow in certain direction. However, after the reformation in 1998, there is a growing number of independent creative hubs in major cities such as Jakarta and Bandung, mostly initiated by artist collectives. Today, the emergence of creative hubs has also establishes other form of spaces: creative space, co-working and maker space. The research will focus on the production of these spaces, by identifying the important actors and users. Currently, creative spaces are driven by individual parties or community, but there is a growing trend for government-dedicated creative spaces as well as hubs which are fully sponsored by giant real estate or tech companies. Therefore, the paper also aims on analyzing the support of government towards innovation in local and national level. Author will use the lens of urban planning and design to assess the impact of these spaces, as the growing landscape of creative hubs has a potential to alter a district.
Abstract ID :
ISO669
Submission Type
Research Assistant
,
Singapore ETH Centre - Future Cities Laboratory

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