Papers

The city branding shows the relation of the goals of managing the city’s image that needs to be planned. The city branding is not about slogans, logos and promotional campaign, but it will be taken in practical program framework of the local development planning. The purpose of this paper is to identify an empirical city branding framework in Pri...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

Nowadays, it is becoming more acceptable that the city is developing with a new town constructed in its periphery area in order to protect the historic city. While adopting this mode may also leads to the deprivation of urban vitality, causing the disintegration of traditional urban form and activities, which are the most valuable heritage that sho...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

Chinese Eastern Railway is the well-conserved linear cultural heritage in China in the 20th century. Despite that the conservation career of cultural heritage along Chinese Eastern Railway flourishes, the contradicted benefit demands between the conservation of historic buildings and the orderly development of the city is increasingly obvious. In t...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

Since modern times, Russia and Japan fought for the rights of railways in northeastern China. Therefore, a large number of colonial towns of railway-affiliated land were built at that time. At the same time, the northeast authorities of China built commercial lands next to the colonial town to resist the invasion of the foreign powers, thus the col...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for culturePaper

Knowledge economy drives spatial development, often resulting in agglomeration (Bentlage 2014, Luthi 2011). The transition of the world from service economy to knowledge economy prompts planners to shift focus from a mono-centric “city” to a polycentric “urban agglomeration” (Yao et all 2006). In the onset of the new economic order, “know...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for culturePaper

Rural revitalization has been a top priority in China since 2018. This study compares the developmental decisions of Village Regeneration and Rural Revitalization from an institutional perspective. It is believed that the core of Village Regeneration lies in “demolish-redevelop” model such as the construction of new socialist countryside in ear...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for culturePaper

Recently the importance of maintaining of historic identity of the cities is an obvious matter in restoration of a city. Each city depends on its cultural perception and its wealth, tries to reserve and repair its cultural heritage. This matter has been done in many cities in the world and many historic urban fabrics have been restored and rehabili...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureDraft Presentation

The world has witnessed the widespread use of city branding in many parts of the world during the last decade or so (Kavaratzis, 2005; Freire, 2007). City managers are in competition to attract investments and tourists. In doing so, cities are branded in according to their unique characteristics and potentials. While research exploring the implemen...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for culturePaper

This research project will explore the relationship between planning strategies and multi-culturalism in Old Deira, Dubai. Now an established global city that is firmly integrated in the world economy, Dubai is a salient case study to scrutinise the role of cultural diversity in the growth of this (mini) mega-city. Dubai is a strategic trade and lo...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

With the rapid development of Chinese railways, the renewal and reuse of railway industrial heritage is an important part of remembering urban history and inheriting urban culture. Hengdaohezi Town in Heilongjiang Province of China is the historical heritage in the period of Russia "building railways by borrowing land" in Northeast China at the beg...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

This paper intends to define a concept of urban planning heritage, and distinguish it with related concepts. It tries to provide a theoretical framework for the value evaluation, and takes some famous urban planning heritage as case study to propose some ideas for the preservation and utilization as reference. Heritage is a comprehensive storage sy...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for culturePaper

The Beyond Heritage: Culture as Urban Renewal Resource Session focuses on the contemporary approaches in using cultural heritage as a tool for urban renewal. Based on the results of the recent two very different UPAT workshops in China – Suzhou’s “Panmen-Shantang Street in the Grand Canal National Culture Park” and Wuhan’s “New Hangzhen...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureSession Proposal

Although there is substantial literature on the implementation of integrated water resources management and multilevel governance of water, less attention is given on how and why cultural values contribute to the integration level of its implementation. Thus, this paper examines cultural ecological knowledge impacts on current water management prac...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureDraft Presentation

Background and aim: Being the first cities benefited from the Reform and Opening Up policy since 1978, Guangzhou acts as the pioneer of the economic development of the country and develops to be a prosperous metropolis. While with China entering a “new normal” stage, the case of Guangzhou Old City poses the challenge where a highly self-grown u...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for culturePaper

Knowledge about how built heritage and megacities interact is still limited. At this stage of development, it is not yet clear what are winning approaches, how to measure performance, which data should be collected and how, and what is optimal way of using potentials of new technologies for that purpose. EU invested substantial resources into defin...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

This paper looks at some of the challenges of planning for healthy and resilient cities with a focus on the features of the physical structure. We examine desired densities and open spaces proportions, green areas, as well as the role and extent of transportation networks. The above quest for the balance is illustrated by the case study of the city...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

In China, urbanization progress is shaping rapidly the urban space and urban society. Megacities are attracting incoming migrant labour and correspondingly external investment from national and international real estate developers. Conflicts between different social groups in space usage become more intensified and critical. Informal entrepreneurs ...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureDraft Presentation

The wide application of digital media has had a profound impact on the development of urban culture and the lives of residents. Urban citizens promote a public, bottom-up cultural reproduction through interactive communication on digital media. The advent of social media such as short video apps “Tik Tok” has led to the emergence of a number of...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for culturePaper

The world is undergoing the largest wave of urban growth in history due to rapid urbanization. Africa’s fast rate of urbanization is being driven by several factors, among them population growth and migration. Urbanization results in development pressure on existing infrastructure and numerous existing buildings are being destroyed in the process...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureCase Study/Research Project

In this paper, the research objects are two historical and cultural blocks in Harbin which is a representative historic city located on the Northeast China. One of objects is the Central Street of Harbin, which attracts countless foreign visitors every year as a popular tourist area. The other object is the Chinese Baroque Historical Block, which i...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

Berlin exemplifies the relationships between (sub)culture, identity, and the emergent knowledge economy like no other. Unique conditions, including the aftermath of two World Wars, a generation-long separation by the Berlin Wall, and a period of failed investment-led over-speculation, created a testbed for alternative cultures, local creativity, an...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureCase Study/Research Project

This paper aims to investigate the extent to which a rural community develops a capacity to support the establishment of a local creative economy despite various limitations. This study employs qualitative research methods in examining two villages in Indonesia, namely Kasongan and Krebet. Our findings show that the community capacity and actor net...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

The 1001 fairy tale of the East, a cultural capital of Kazakhstan, a center of arts and festivals of Central Asia, a contemporary oasis in Syr Darya valley. There are only a few targets of urban transformation of Turkistan, the masterplan strategy designed by interdisciplinary team of Urban Sustain Architecture (Kiev) and Frame Art (Astana). Turkis...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureDraft Presentation

The identity of a city is visibly recognized by observing its urban form. The development plans of the cities of Bangladesh address landuse planning and ignore the aptness of urban form. As a result, the cities of Bangladesh are growing haphazardly and turning into urban jungle rather than aesthetically pleasing habitable urban space. This study ex...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

Most of the cities in the world are witnessing tremendous changes in their urban landscape, over the last half-century. Under the modern planning regime, the spatial layout organization of a city is very much dictated by the ease of motorized movement priority, in order to cope with increased travel demands as a result of the pressing growth of the...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureDraft Presentation

Jakarta is the second largest contiguous urban area in the world, which inhabited by more than 30 million people in its metropolitan area (Demographia, 2015). Although Jakarta has played its role as an economic engine within the region, economic disparity and informality have frightened its success. Discussing informal settlement in Jakarta cannot ...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for culturePaper

Abstract:Guizhou, Yunnan is located in the northwestern part of China, with a large number of ethnic minority areas, of which Miao, Dong and Yi nationalities are important ethnic groups in terms of quantity and distribution. The southwestern part of China retains a large number of landscapes and traditional buildings, including terraces, Miao vil...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

Saddar Cantonment is the historic center of Karachi, possessing culturally rich and vibrant landscapes, where Empress Market (A British Colonial market from early 19th century) sets the backdrop for the small scale entrepreneurs who act as the living character of the environment. The area also acts as the transit hub for the city, as it connects th...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for culturePaper

The shift towards knowledge economy accompanied with the flow of people, capital and goods has manifold effects on urban development. On the one hand, cities are becoming more alike: in chasing for profit, global capitalism imposes spatial patterns that lack distinctiveness. On the other hand, network society makes people living in a global village...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper

With the implementation of benefit-oriented urban renewal, a number of historical blocks has lost their identifiability. The historical block is the external entity performance of urban culture. The disappearance and homogenization of the historical block directly led to the city losing its place attachment, and the overall identifiability of the u...

4: Knowledge economies and identity: planning for cultureFull Paper