TRACK 4: Knowledge economies and identity Hotel Borobudur Jakarta (Banda B)
Sep 11, 2019 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM(Europe/Amsterdam)
20190911T1400 20190911T1530 Europe/Amsterdam 4.6 Culture, heritage and sustainable redevelopment

The main purpose of this session is to discuss the culture and heritage issues in the wider context of the sustainable development concept and practice. In particular, the interrelations between urban form, socioeconomic issues, environmental concerns as well as heritage and identity aspects of urban transformation will be put in the centre of this debate. On that basis, more specific issues will be dealt with, such as roles of various types of development and economies as well as emerging and re-established knowledge hubs in the process of sustaining urban and regional development. Furthermore, social problems associated with gentrification and social exclusion will be debated on. The cases analysed will include both (but not exclusively) Asian and African cases, including South African, Nigerian, Indonesian and Chinese ones.  

In addition, a special session dealing with culture as urban renewal resource will be organised. Accompanied by keynote speeches, all sessions will build a vast picture of contemporary issues associated with 'planning for culture'. 

Hotel Borobudur Jakarta (Banda B) 55th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Jakarta/Bogor, Indonesia congress@isocarp.org

The main purpose of this session is to discuss the culture and heritage issues in the wider context of the sustainable development concept and practice. In particular, the interrelations between urban form, socioeconomic issues, environmental concerns as well as heritage and identity aspects of urban transformation will be put in the centre of this debate. On that basis, more specific issues will be dealt with, such as roles of various types of development and economies as well as emerging and re-established knowledge hubs in the process of sustaining urban and regional development. Furthermore, social problems associated with gentrification and social exclusion will be debated on. The cases analysed will include both (but not exclusively) Asian and African cases, including South African, Nigerian, Indonesian and Chinese ones.  

In addition, a special session dealing with culture as urban renewal resource will be organised. Accompanied by keynote speeches, all sessions will build a vast picture of contemporary issues associated with 'planning for culture'. 

Community capacity for creativity-based rural development in a developing country: Case studies from IndonesiaView Abstract
Full Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/11 12:00:00 UTC - 2019/09/11 13:30:00 UTC
This paper aims to investigate the extent to which a rural community develops a capacity to support the establishment of a local creative economy despite various limitations. This study employs qualitative research methods in examining two villages in Indonesia, namely Kasongan and Krebet. Our findings show that the community capacity and actor networks potentially spark the development of rural economies. Local communities in both cases have utilized cultures and traditions as creative capitals, which were commercialized through communal entrepreneurship and mobilized by an organized network of creative actors. Social values, namely a strong sense of belonging, high shared values and strong emotional connections, are found to be the key factors that foster creative potentials, entrepreneurial capacity, and capacity for mobilization of local resources within the rural communities.
Presenters
TS
Tubagus Furqon Sofhani
Lecturer, School Of Architecture, Planning, And Policy Development, Institut Teknologi Bandung
Research on Online Public Participation and Platform Construction of Historical Block Protection in Data AgeView Abstract
Full Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/11 12:00:00 UTC - 2019/09/11 13:30:00 UTC
With the implementation of benefit-oriented urban renewal, a number of historical blocks has lost their identifiability. The historical block is the external entity performance of urban culture. The disappearance and homogenization of the historical block directly led to the city losing its place attachment, and the overall identifiability of the urban area is weakened. Therefore, it is important to develop a strategy to protect historical block identifiability in urban planning. Traditional urban planning is dominated by government and developers, and is highly dependent on planners’ experience-based judgment, but lacks quantitative analysis of public participation. As a result, it is difficult to carry out an objective and comprehensive analysis while facing the complex situation of historical blocks. The issue of public participation has become an important issue in the process of urban construction and renewal in China and other developing countries. Based on the analysis of the concept and characteristic and technique of the data age, this article discussed (1) The method and mechanism of public participation in the protection of urban historical blocks (2) The content and structures of public participation platform for historical district. Research indicates that the application of cloud technology and reasonable platform design is the focus of public participation in historical blocks protection, which can make public participation from passive participation to active participation, from “lag” to “synchronization”.
Presenters
YY
Yang Yang
HDR Student, Deakin University
Informal entrepreneurs in old districts in central city ShanghaiView Abstract
Draft Presentation 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/11 12:00:00 UTC - 2019/09/11 13:30:00 UTC
In China, urbanization progress is shaping rapidly the urban space and urban society. Megacities are attracting incoming migrant labour and correspondingly external investment from national and international real estate developers. Conflicts between different social groups in space usage become more intensified and critical. Informal entrepreneurs in old districts in Shanghai are mainly the migrant generation released from agricultural sector after the 1980s, rooted in the wide rural land surrounding metropolitan regions. The conflicts between the informal entrepreneurs and the newcomer business developer, between the informal working environment and the new business development projects, indicate a wider conflict beyond the metropolitan level, between the development in the rural land and urban land. This paper focuses on those informal sectors in old districts in Shanghai, including family-owned retail shops, street vendors, recycling, delivery etc.. Informal economy plays a significant role in filling up the blanks in the current economic structure. It offers enormous work opportunities for migrant labour, who are excluded from the labour market due to low-level education and lack of financial resources. The research consists of two parts. The first part concentrates on the observation survey on the physical environment and working condition of the migrant labour. Study on certain urban spaces is meaningful. It will help us to understand the space features, social functions, and social meanings of those urban spaces. Their meaning is unfortunately inadvertently or intentionally ignored in the public discussion. Which turns into the result of a large-scaled demolishment in old districts and the tearing of native social network in the process of urban renovation. The second part opens a discussion on a progressive urban developmental strategy, aiming to modify the current urban renewal process and soften the effect of business development projects. Small-scaled and gradual progress allows further conservation of the working places of migrant labour and native social network. With a low-key intervention method, to approach an efficient improvement on the physical environment quality. As the ultimate goal, to integrate the native community and migrant workers into the process of urban development and extend the interaction mechanism within the native community into the new projects.
Presenters
QS
Qi Shen
Albert Speer + Partner GmbH
Forward Thinking on Culturally Urban Imprint in the Contemporary Era Rejuvenating the Traditional Neighbourhood Values and Characters: An Urban Morphology Review on Qatari CitiesView Abstract
Draft Presentation 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/11 12:00:00 UTC - 2019/09/11 13:30:00 UTC
Most of the cities in the world are witnessing tremendous changes in their urban landscape, over the last half-century. Under the modern planning regime, the spatial layout organization of a city is very much dictated by the ease of motorized movement priority, in order to cope with increased travel demands as a result of the pressing growth of the economy and population. Today, it becomes planning norm that the primary determinants to define a city’s spatial structure are based upon motorized movement patterns, along with other factors such as the population size, urban capacity, and the growth size or scale. The upside of such approach is that the spatial structure becomes more effective and efficient in accommodating a denser population with their infrastructure service, and in anticipating the future expansion. However, the downside will be the tendency to undermining the ‘people factor’ with their social cultural life and activities. Without careful thinking and proper planning, one of the impacts of highly prioritized transport infrastructure in shaping the city spatial structure, is the loss of identity. There is a danger of the unique urban culture being diluted and forgotten, leaving ‘a legacy’ of soul-less cities everywhere, with each lacking any distinct personality or character. With more and more cities seeking to enhance their competitive global position through employing cultural strategies in their developments, it is definitely ‘a wake-up call’ for cities that have been busy focusing on their rapid modern developments without wisely maintain their local identity and character. Urban identity needs to reflect cultural and historical values, through modern interpretation and not simply by importing foreign templates. Therefore, the urban imprint should be recognized as an illustration of a place’s culture and traditions. It demystifies the interaction of built environment and people with all their values, that work together to define an identity. In this paper, Qatari cities and towns become the study context as they also experience extreme speed of changes after the discovery of oil and gas in the 1970s, and in current situation, a globalized language of urbanism has overshadowed the then Qatari’s unique blend of maritime, rural and urban culture. The world of motorways has become dominant over ‘the used to be’ tightly-knitted neighbourhoods with intricate alleyways (sikka) and small public open spaces (barahat). This paper mainly examines the morphology of traditional neigbourhoods that are still intact in the Downtown Doha area and other old towns (such as Umm Slal Mohammad, Al Wakrah and Al Khor) and seeks the opportunity to capture their key principal characters to inspire the modern spatial layout. The paper comprises of three sections. The first section discusses the evolutionary morphological process of Qatari cities and towns, from rural-village characters to modern spatial layout and its impacts. The second section analyses the traditional neighbourhoods (fereej) as the smaller unit of the city, to elicit attributable principal factors that shape them (i.e. tradition, social cultural values, climate sensitivity, physical pattern) as well as the current adoption of modern spatial layout. And last section elicits the best way forward in defining appropriate urban morphology that fit-well to Qatar context, and in employing cultural strategy to enhance it.
Presenters
HS
Harini Septiana
Senior Urban Designer Specialist, Qatar Ministry Of Municipality And Environment
NA
Noora Al Naema
Architect Engineer, Qatar Ministry Of Municipality And Environment
Cultural Heritage Conservation and the Sustainability of City’s Orderly Development: identification, conservation and construction of historic spaceView Abstract
Full Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/11 12:00:00 UTC - 2019/09/11 13:30:00 UTC
Chinese Eastern Railway is the well-conserved linear cultural heritage in China in the 20th century. Despite that the conservation career of cultural heritage along Chinese Eastern Railway flourishes, the contradicted benefit demands between the conservation of historic buildings and the orderly development of the city is increasingly obvious. In this paper, Hengdaohezi Town, a station-located town along Chinese Eastern Railway, is taken as an example to explore its conservation of cultural heritage and sustainable ways for city’s orderly development from the view of historical space. It’s indicated from the results that mutually contradicted benefit demands could be balanced through the identification, conservation and construction of historic space. Then the requirements of historic heritage conservation are satisfied through the combination of conservation zoning delineation, limitation of building height, integration of spatial morphology, etc. Additionally, city development and construction and living environments could be improved through the adjustment of land use, alleviation of road traffic, upgrade of greening system, remediation of ecological environment, etc. Moreover, it’s shown from the realization ways that identification, conservation and construction of historic space is one of the ways to achieve the sustainable development of historic towns.
Presenters
ZZ
Zhiqing Zhao
Professor, Harbin Institute Of Technology
bz
Bocheng Zhang
Doctoral Candidate, Harbin Institute Of Technology
Forever frenemies: built heritage, megacities and new technologiesView Abstract
Full Paper 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/11 12:00:00 UTC - 2019/09/11 13:30:00 UTC
Knowledge about how built heritage and megacities interact is still limited. At this stage of development, it is not yet clear what are winning approaches, how to measure performance, which data should be collected and how, and what is optimal way of using potentials of new technologies for that purpose. EU invested substantial resources into defining policy framework for culture and puts further efforts thorough understanding of it, which points out its huge estimated importance for societal well-being. Built heritage is most evident component of it, being usually “hardware” for all other cultural industries, and, at the same time, it is the most threatened by growth of cities. Significant contributions to better understanding of problem comes from World Bank, and work of Pedro B. Ortiz, followed by e.g. academic research at MIT (USA) and Politecnico di Milano, which address management of metropolis in general. However, we are far from having all the answers. In this paper we focused on modelling – with its core in interaction between mega cites and built heritage. From one side, there are heritage experts who value their legacy according to success in preserving heritage, on the other side – there are planners facing new economic and societal challenges due to historic growth of urban population. In addition, there are new technologies which develop faster than the capacity to apply them adequately. Therefore, we analysed collecting and processing data which are required for clear insight and objective evaluation of an outcome. We discussed methodology – combination of methods and technique which may lead to desired outcome – full understanding and control within planning and management of existing and emerging mega cities. Having in mind that size determines economic performance, quality of life and subsequently future of a mega city, including if there will be any, understanding this correlation substantially helps good governance.
Presenters Natasa Zivaljevic Luxor
Director, NHF, Institute For Urban Planning
Lecturer
,
School of Architecture, Planning, and Policy Development, Institut Teknologi Bandung
HDR student
,
Deakin University
Albert Speer + Partner GmbH
Senior Urban Designer Specialist
,
Qatar Ministry of Municipality and Environment
Harbin Institute of Technology,school of Architecture
+ 1 more speakers. View All
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SECOND URBAN PLANNING RESEARCHER
,
URBAN PLANNING DEPARTMENT
 Youngrok Cho
assistant manager
,
yooshin
 Natalia Tanan
Researcher
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Institute of Road Engineering, Ministry of Public Works and Housing, Indonesia
 FADLY HALEY TANJUNG
Master Degree Student in Urban and Regional Planning
,
Bandung Institute of Technology
 Annisa B Tribhuwaneswari
Lecturer
,
Universitas PGRI Adi Buana Surabaya
+3 more attendees. View All
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