TRACK 3: Liveable places and healthy cities | Special Session Hotel Borobudur Jakarta (Flores A+B)
Sep 10, 2019 09:00 AM - 11:00 AM(Europe/Amsterdam)
20190910T0900 20190910T1100 Europe/Amsterdam 3.1 UNICEF Opening Session: Children and Cities, Planning for the Future (Special Session)

Discussions under track 3 highlight the complex relation between urban health issues, spatial inequity and environmental challenges. Especially in large and fragmented urban contexts, this requires a focus on equity and people-centred urban planning approaches, to ensure urban development and upgrading translates in healthy, safe and inclusive spaces. Analysing the evidence, successful initiatives, strategies and projects, this opening session, organised by UNICEF and supported by a panel of experts, will highlight priorities for action in order to build and plan healthy cities for children and their communities.

Hotel Borobudur Jakarta (Flores A+B) 55th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Jakarta/Bogor, Indonesia congress@isocarp.org

Discussions under track 3 highlight the complex relation between urban health issues, spatial inequity and environmental challenges. Especially in large and fragmented urban contexts, this requires a focus on equity and people-centred urban planning approaches, to ensure urban development and upgrading translates in healthy, safe and inclusive spaces. Analysing the evidence, successful initiatives, strategies and projects, this opening session, organised by UNICEF and supported by a panel of experts, will highlight priorities for action in order to build and plan healthy cities for children and their communities.

Importance of air quality management for public health and development progress in Jakarta, Indonesia View Abstract
Draft Presentation 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/10 07:30:00 UTC - 2019/09/10 09:00:00 UTC
Air pollution levels in metropolitan Jakarta, capital city region of Indonesia, are high and rising, posing a serious public health threat to 32 million residents. it was estimated that over 5.5 million people in DKI Jakarta (58% of the population) suffered from various air pollution-related illnesses (e.g., asthmatic bronchiale, coronary artery diseases) in 2016, and the associated direct medical cost could go as high as IDR 51.2 trillions (or USD 3.9 billions). Experts also reported that the total economic cost of health problems associated with air pollution in Jakarta would increase to 2.5% of Jakarta’s expected GDP in 2015 (or 4.3 trillion rupiah or USD403 million) as opposed to 1% in 1998, if no action to control air pollution is taken. In 2017, the annual average concentration for particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 micron (PM2.5) was 41 ug/m3; daily concentrations rarely meet the World Health Organization’s health-based air quality standard of 25 ug/m3. The current official air pollution monitoring conducted in Jakarta is inadequate: PM2.5 is not monitored nor have there been recent assessments of particle composition to inform source apportionment. These limitations and a lack of reliable emissions inventories and regional air pollution data are barriers to planning and implementing greater control of air pollution in DKI Jakarta. In 2018, the Governor’s office announced “Grand Design: Air Pollution for a Healthy Livable City” to carry out a multi-stakeholder assessment and planning process to produce recommendations for air quality improvement in Jakarta. This talk highlights approaches to combining strategic use of innovations in air pollution monitoring, emissions estimation and source apportionment modeling to inform near-term control measures for priority sources at a local and regional level in Jakarta. Topics to be addressed will include: multi-stakeholder collaborative approach for complex issues like air pollution, the importance of strategic communications and public awareness of air pollution health effects, emerging results from source apportionment work underway to identify leading PM2.5 sources in the metropolitan area, the policy implications of emerging local data on air pollution and stunting, and the challenges of addressing both local pollution sources within direct control of DKI Jakarta and transported pollution from sources such as episodic haze from peatland fires.
Presenters Lynn Tang
Director Of Programs, Vital Strategies
VP
Vivian Pun
Air Pollution Epidemiologist, Vital Strategies
RR
Ririn Radiawati
Panel discussion on Children in cities View Abstract
Session Proposal 09:30 AM - 09:45 AM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/10 07:30:00 UTC - 2019/09/10 07:45:00 UTC
Suggestion to organize this session with ISOCARP as an opening or closing session of the Congress with Mayors and decision makers in urban planning. In 2015, 54 per cent of the world’s population - close to 4 billion people - lived in cities. The population is expected to rise by an additional 1 billion people by 2030, when cities will contain 60 per cent of the world’s population. East Asia is one of the most highly urbanized regions globally; posting both vibrant growth and emerging challenges. There is an inextricable link between the growth of safe and sustainable cities in East Asia and the well-being of the region’s children. The region is home to some of the fastest growing and most populated mega cities in the world, such as Jakarta. It is also experiencing dramatic growth in small and medium-sized cities, where more than half of its urban population lives. By 2030, more than 70 per cent of people living in the region will live in urban areas. This rural-urban shift creates incredible developmental opportunities across the region. Children and adolescents – whose personal, cognitive, physical and socioemotional development is powerfully influenced and ‘sculpted’ by the new urban experience – should be the clear winners of this urban century. Making urbanization work for every child will yield dividends for all citizens. However, despite high economic growth and far reaching social transformation in fast urbanising countries, poverty and social, economic and gender disparities still prevent millions of children from developing to their full potential. UNICEF sees three pillars of investments that urban planners and city governments should focus on: 1. Get better urban data and evidence that reveals intra-urban disparities for children, including children in informal settlements/impoverished areas and that is accessible for all and used for planning 2. Access to basic services for all children 3. Better urban environments with accessible public spaces for children, healthy and safe transportation, clean air and sustainable resource management, in particular water, sanitation, waste and food 4. Meaningful participation mechanisms that ensure children and their communities are engaged from assessment to co-production of solutions, to strengthen neighbourhoods in ever growing cities. The panel session will offer insight from panel experts on challenges for children in cities and how urban planning can be a support to ensure children get the urban childhood they deserve. The panel could also be informed by a documentary or presentation of survey by children on what are their needs and solutions for cities (tbc). o representative of UNICEF o representative of city in Indonesia or South-East Asia (city leader or head urban planning) o adolescent representatives (It is recommended that they would also be involved in the Young Planning Professionals Workshop that will take place the week prior to the Congress) o representative United Cities and Local Governments Asia Pacific o representative urban planner member of ISOCARP
Presenters
TG
Thomas George
Senior Advisor Urban, UNICEF
Director of Programs
,
Vital Strategies
Urban Planning Specialist
,
UNICEF
No moderator for this session!
Mr Tjark Gall
Researcher
,
ISOCARP Institute
 Latifah Latifah
Associate Planner
,
Nusantara Urban Advisory
 Dwitantri Rezkiandini Lestari
Associate Planner
,
Nusantara Urban Advisory
 Dhea  Andriani
Student
,
Pakuan University
Mr Shuai Li
master student
,
Tongji University
+8 more attendees. View All
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