TRACK 6: Changing environment and risks Hotel Borobudur Jakarta (Sumba B)
Sep 10, 2019 09:00 AM - 11:00 AM(Europe/Amsterdam)
20190910T0900 20190910T1100 Europe/Amsterdam 6.1 General Introduction: Climate Change – Globally

Climate change is probably the biggest man-made global threat we are currently facing. This comes in a time where our cities are growing in an unprecedented way – often in areas that are affected the most by climate change. This session wants to give a general introduction to the topic, outline its main fields of impact and evaluate what we can do to steer measures globally.

Hotel Borobudur Jakarta (Sumba B) 55th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Jakarta/Bogor, Indonesia congress@isocarp.org

Climate change is probably the biggest man-made global threat we are currently facing. This comes in a time where our cities are growing in an unprecedented way – often in areas that are affected the most by climate change. This session wants to give a general introduction to the topic, outline its main fields of impact and evaluate what we can do to steer measures globally.

Trans-disciplinary planning approaches towards resilience View Abstract
Full Paper 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/10 07:30:00 UTC - 2019/09/10 09:00:00 UTC
“Within 50 years the entire world will be urbanised. We have one half century left to get urbanisation right” (McArthy, 2016). Urban functions are no longer separated spatially or socially, and the contest between diverse land-uses is reaching a peak due to growing populations and increasing urbanization that inflates the pressure on already strained resources within the urban fabric. The trend of depletion of green spaces is an increasing global phenomenon, intensifying the growing carbon footprint, impairing water quality and compromising health and overall quality of life, ultimately leading to cities that are far removed from the safe, clean, and livable environments, as envisioned in planning theory. Green spaces are often viewed as a “luxury good”, despite the comprehensive literature on the extensive benefits of such spaces to their host cities and communities. Misconceptions relating to the notion of green spaces are reflected in the undervaluation of these spaces, under-prioritization in the budgeting process and ultimate negligence in terms of broader spatial planning approaches. The lack of function and ownership further exacerbate the social- and economic value of these green spaces, especially within the South African context, apparent by the disproval of the compensation hypothesis and rejection of the proximity principle. Much effort will be needed to change perceptions and sensitize decision-makers to understand green spaces as a “public good” and “economic asset”. Resilience thinking could pose solutions in this regard, drawing on trans-disciplinary planning approaches to manage change and steer Spatial Planning towards the era of transurbanism. It would however, require the emancipation of the disciplinary identity of Spatial Planning as crucial driver towards resilience, departing from theoretical and methodological frames of supplementary disciplines, as well as the indigenous knowledge and living experiences of communities, to co-produce urban innovations. Conveying strategic and lateral thinking, contemporary Planners would need to become generative leaders, with socio-emotional intelligence, to generate innovation and co-create solutions for strained social contexts, for depleting scare resources, for managing change of contemporary urban landscapes.
Presenters Juanee Cilliers
Chair Person Urban Planning North-West University, North-West University
360cityscan: integrated solutions to face urban challengesView Abstract
Draft Presentation 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/10 07:30:00 UTC - 2019/09/10 09:00:00 UTC
Tractebel has developed the 360° city scan, a holistic methodology to assess cities and guide them according to their needs and priorities. Scans have already been deployed in more than 40 cities worldwide. Based on this scan, we offer integrated approaches to our clients, tailormade solutions leveraging on our urban engineering expertise. The perspectives of the 360cityscan meet the global challenges cities face today: climate change, resource scarcity, technologisation, demographic changes, social transformation and glocalisation. Within cities, the intensity of these challenges is much higher than in rural conditions. All perspectives are somehow related to these challenges; the perspectives give therefore an accurate status of the city against these threats. The perspectives work together as a whole towards a balanced city. The perspectives must be seen as different layers of a city, a balanced city encloses all the different perspectives in a good ratio. When one perspective is underdeveloped, the city does not work properly or excludes citizens. Preferably, each intervention in the city has a positive impact on all the perspectives. We created a tool to measure the level of maturity for the different themes. The inner 2 circles represent the status of the physical system of the theme, the outer 2 circles the ‘efficiency’ or ‘quality’. To illustrate this for ‘water’: the inner circles indicate the status of the basic infrastructure of water (amount of people with wastewater collection), in the outer circles we measure the level of wastewater treatment by the city. The city is shown in a user-friendly 360° diagram with an individual score for each theme, arranged by perspective. The diagram summarizes in a visual way the maturity of a city and highlights the strength’s and challenges. If well designed and managed, cities offer important opportunities for economic development and for expanding access to basic services, including health care and education, for large numbers of people. Coming from a engineering background of top-level expertise in Energy, Transport, Water, Urban design, ...the integration of different teams and know-how is essential to deal with the complexity of issues and challenges that cities are facing worldwide and for successful sustainable urban development . Searching for synergy between different disciplines is in this sense key to unlock hidden potentials. When they meet and connect, creative solutions to complex problems are found. Urban processes are also becoming increasingly complex given the fast-changing evolutions in terms of stakeholders, policy governance and political processes. In this perspective a more process oriented and collaborative way of working is needed, with different in between goals of diverse scale and nature instead of blue print masterplanning approach. This way of working will allow a stronger local embedded and bottom-up approach involving a large set of stakeholders from the beginning to the end. Also Technology is changing the way citizens live, move and work: smart city platforms, BIM, City Information Modelling, ... .Cities are becoming data platforms: as more data are available, urban development projects should be able to collect and exploit them to build new sustainable and liveable cities. For this reason technologies need to be combined with a strong focus on qualitative design in the entire range of elements that compose a city: from infrastructures to public space and buildings. The Integrated Approaches (11) represent innovative transversal domains defined to emphasize the integration of our services and expertise related to cities and territories: Places of mobility - Water Urbanism - Productive landscapes - Recycling territories - Smart networks ... . All together the Integrated Approaches cover the complexity of issues that cities are facing nowadays through the fundamental paradigm of ‘integration’.
Presenters Etienne Drouet
Head Of Urban APAC, Tractebel Engineering
Expanding an understanding of urban resilience in the realm of adaptation planningView Abstract
Full Paper 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/10 07:30:00 UTC - 2019/09/10 09:00:00 UTC
As cities have become more central to development, risk assessment and prevention instruments have gained greater importance in urban planning considerations. By using the case study of Mexico City’s Climate Action Programme, this piece of work contests the way in which resilience has been embedded in urban adaptation planning. Grounded on a planning evaluation based approach to analyse on which methodologies, tools, and evaluation frameworks have been used, and which key actions and strategic lines to building cities resilience are contemplated, this descriptive research incorporates urban-regional metabolism dynamics and environmental data such as carrying capacity, into the climate change scenarios and vulnerability analysis matrix. By doing so, the article introduces new ideas that can: i) move from risk management to uncertainty oriented planning; ii) understand vulnerability in the context of equitable sustainable development, while highlights the opportunities transformative resilience offers to enable transformations towards sustainable urban futures.
Presenters Natalie Rosales
Researcher, Conacyt-El Colegio Mexiquense
Chair Person Urban Planning North-West University
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North-West University
Head of Urban APAC
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Tractebel Engineering
Researcher
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Conacyt-El Colegio Mexiquense
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