TRACK 7: Urban governance and planning profession Hotel Borobudur Jakarta (Ambon+Nias+Ceram)
Sep 10, 2019 09:00 AM - 11:00 AM(Europe/Amsterdam)
20190910T0900 20190910T1100 Europe/Amsterdam 7.1 Cross-border Governance

Megacities and large metropolis are expanding out of the national or regional limits. The different spatial management systems in each country should be articulated to better manage these megapolises. How to manage functional metropolitan areas located on several national or regional jurisdictions with contradictory laws, standards and management systems? The coordination tools are crucial for managing spatial and social dynamics, offer cross-border infrastructures and services. How should these multi-actor and multi-level spaces ensure effective cooperation and collaboration?

Hotel Borobudur Jakarta (Ambon+Nias+Ceram) 55th ISOCARP World Planning Congress in Jakarta/Bogor, Indonesia congress@isocarp.org

Megacities and large metropolis are expanding out of the national or regional limits. The different spatial management systems in each country should be articulated to better manage these megapolises. How to manage functional metropolitan areas located on several national or regional jurisdictions with contradictory laws, standards and management systems? The coordination tools are crucial for managing spatial and social dynamics, offer cross-border infrastructures and services. How should these multi-actor and multi-level spaces ensure effective cooperation and collaboration?

Towards effective planning of transborder city regions: three Australian case studies.View Abstract
Full Paper 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/10 07:30:00 UTC - 2019/09/10 09:00:00 UTC
With the rise of “global city regions” since the late twentieth century (Simmonds and Hack 2000; Scott et al. 2014), there has been increasing acknowledgment that new models are replacing the twentieth century urban conception of a metropolis. The phenomenon of the polycentric city region has superseded the old idea of suburbs radiating out around a single city centre or ‘CBD’ (Garreau 1991; Calthorpe and Fulton 2013). Suburbs are becoming urbanized within these new city regions and ‘placeless’ suburbs are beginning to be transformed through the creation of denser, mixed use suburban centres connected by efficient public transport (Al-Kodmany 2016; Beske and Dixon 2018). These polycentric city regions are increasingly spreading across state and national borders. Such transborder city regions have been noted around the world, including in Europe, Asia and the Americas/ North America. Well known examples include: • the expansion of Shenzen (and other Pearl River Delta cities) and neighbouring separately-administered Hong Kong; • Aachen-Maastricht-Liege (Germany, Netherlands and France); • San Diego (US) – Tijuana (Mexico); and • the ‘BonNYWash’ crescent embracing Boston, New York and Washington across several north-eastern states in the USA. In addition to transborder city regions such as these, there are increasing examples of cross-border collaboration in economic development corridors such as the Dublin-Belfast corridor (linking Ireland and Northern Ireland), the Oresund corridor between Copenhagen (Denmark) and Malmo (Sweden) and the link across the Causeway between Singapore and Johor, Malaysia. Such corridors typically involve a focus on improving transport connections and partnerships to improve the economic well-being and international competitiveness of formerly discrete cities and towns. This paper examines the uneven progress of policy for regional planning of Australia’s emerging internal transborder city regions since the 1970s. Three contrasting case studies are presented, focusing on regional plans in three city regions that extend across state and territory borders within Australia. As an exploratory research paper, the case study methods used are a combination of literature review, document research and policy analysis of city-regional plans. Comparisons are made with selected international transborder city regions. The Australian case studies illustrate that development of effective transborder city regions, even within one country, depends on overcoming differing levels of commitment to transborder planning by the state or territory jurisdictions involved. This commitment may also be shaped by the different balance between resources (eg infrastructure, jobs) and population within a city region that spans across state or national borders. References Al-Khodmany, K 2016 New Suburbanism: sustainable tall building development. London and New York: Routledge. Beske, J and D Dixon (eds) 2018, Suburban Remix: creating the next generation of urban places. Washington DC: Island Press. Calthorpe, P and W Fulton 2013 The Regional City: new urbanism and the end of sprawl. Washington DC: Island Press. Garreau, J 1991 Edge City: life on the new frontier. New York: Doubleday. Scott, A, J Agnew, E Soja, and M Storper 2014 Global city-regions: an overview. Accessed 4 April 2019 at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/265192243_GLOBAL_CITY-REGIONS_AN_OVERVIEW Simmonds, R and G Hack 2000 Global City Regions: their emerging forms. Abingdon and New York: Spon.
Presenters
DO
Daniel O'Hare
Associate Professor Urban Planning, Faculty Of Society And Design, Bond University
Dynamics of public urban waterfront regeneration in Istanbul, the case of Halic Shipyard ConservationView Abstract
Full Paper 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/10 07:30:00 UTC - 2019/09/10 09:00:00 UTC
In the process of globalization, building on the particular spatial scenery of the waterfront, cities tend to refresh their strategies of development to adapt new trends of urban life with huge urban waterfront regeneration projects. These usually focus on a target of maximum marketing and construction of a new image-vision, which aims to represent the city in the global agenda. This aspect is depending on bigger changes in the urban context, the shift in government structures to entrepreneurial forms that involve externalization of state functions (Swyngedouw 2005; p. 1998). The rationale behind the phenomenon of waterfront regeneration and the global embracement of it is now “widely recognized if incompletely understood" (Hoyle 2001 pp. 297), as the relevant literature is based on case studies with focus on the examples of North American and European cities. The goal is to contribute to the more general, theoretical contention of urban waterfront regeneration in developing countries in understanding their dimensions in terms of governance and planning. The research tackles urban waterfront regeneration in Istanbul, Turkey by studying the most recent initiative of urban waterfront regeneration along Halic /The Golden Horn, the Halic Shipyard Conservation Project. The theoretical framework that underpins this study is derived from the discourse on new forms of urban governance including private, public and civic actors (Paquet 2001) that influence planning processes and project outcomes. To evaluate the planning process from a comprehensive governance perspective, indicators include: the legal framework, decision-making process, actors and their relations (Nuissl and Heinrichs 2010) and as normative the perspective of an inclusive planning approach (Healey 1997, 2006) helps to evaluate the planning process of the project. As urban waterfront regeneration literature is mostly based upon case study approaches, a critical overview of international examples is conducted. Both primary and secondary data is collected through: literature review, review of laws, review of official documents and land-use plans, an internship, 31 interviews, 91 questionnaires, participatory observation, an workshops, observation and photographs. The aim is to assess to which extend the top-down governance forms, but also bottom-up grass root empowerment influence the planning process and project outcomes, giving recommendations for an inclusive planning approach. The second aim is to evaluate the urban waterfront regeneration project studying its impact on the neighboring community. Bedrettin Neighborhood is chosen for analysis and its position in the planning process along with its needs are exposed. The thesis argues the modes in which along with clear targets for the improvement of the quality of life for the neighboring community, the urban waterfront regeneration project, Halic Shipyard Conservation Project, will be able to escape the current deadlocks and collisions between government, investors, resistance and local community and might have a chance to actually set an urgently needed precedent of a new planning culture in Istanbul.
Presenters
SG
Serin Geambazu
Assistant Professor, University Ion Mincu, Bucharest
Practical point of view: preparation of the National Urban Policy FrameworkView Abstract
Full Paper 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/10 07:30:00 UTC - 2019/09/10 09:00:00 UTC
In the end of 2018, The Ministry of Environment of the Republic of Lithuania released a third draft or Lithuanian Urban Policy Framework (LUPF). The document is still reviewed by the government and official approval is pending. Efforts to prepare such a document started in 2008 but were unsuccessful. Latest draft of LUPF was based heavily on the International guidelines of urban and territorial planning ( IG-UPT), New Urban Agenda, Agenda for Sustainable development 2030 and reacted to the IPCC report published in the end of October last year. Preparation of the latest draft of the LUPF started with stakeholder consultations (National and Local government representatives, Professional associations, NGO’s, academic institutions and other relevant stakeholders). Stakeholder consultations were organized by the Ministry of Environment. Later, our firm was appointed to do an in-depth review of international recommendations, Lithuanian strategies and policies connected to the object of the LUPF and previous attempts to prepare urban policy framework and finally bring everything into a coherent, easy to understand value-based document. First draft of the new document was presented for feedback in a stakeholder meeting in early October and later in Lithuanian Urban forum in November of 2018. Goal of LUPF: to create the value basis and precondition for inter-institutional, cross-sectoral cooperation between different administrative levels and stakeholders in order to achieve sustainable urban development. Structure: Document is composed of three interconnecting sections: Directions (1), roles and responsibilities (2) and implementation and monitoring measures (3). LUPF defines four value driven directions (1) local and national governments and relevant stakeholders should follow to ensure Sustainable development of Lithuanian urban areas. Four directions: Mitigation of climate change impacts and resilience to climate change; Synergy and strengthening of urban links; Liveability and social equity and sustainable spatial development. Roles and responsibilities (2) of National and local governments and relevant stakeholders were prepared reusing and localizing most of the recommendations from the IG-UTP. This section defines roles of each interest group in the implementation of the value driven directions for sustainable urban development. Last part – implementation and monitoring (3) – is a part where suggestions are given to how to start the implementation of guidelines and responsibility division. The aim of the paper and presentation for ISOCARP Congress in Jakarta is to review the process of preparing the LUPF and identify key issues and key practical questions that need further studies and discussions. These can be relevant to other countries or cities that are planning to prepare such a document. Although there is a tremendous amount of immensely valuable recommendations prepared by international planning society that could just be translated and used, in countries like Lithuania, that does not have a strong planning culture, direct implementation would mean making a leap in knowledge of how urban areas should develop and there is resistance to making this leap. Therefore, it is an interest of us to share our experience and discuss with fellow planners on how to deal with these issues and integrate international knowledge locally. Urban policy framework in Lithuania is not a success story yet and might never be one but it is an interesting case, from a very practical point of view, of how such a document was prepared. It is a case of an attempt to bring valuable international recommendations for urban policy to Lithuania - a shrinking and aging country of less than 3million people in Eastern Europe.
Presenters Zivile Simkute
Director-urbanist / Lecturer, MB Mash Studio / Kaunas University Of Technology Institute Of Environmental Engineering
Breaking through rigid administrative boundaries - synergies in 'soft' spaces of cooperation.View Abstract
Full Paper 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/10 07:30:00 UTC - 2019/09/10 09:00:00 UTC
Following the necessity for spatial planning to focus on ‘what works’ in terms of implementation and policy delivery, the notion ‘soft’ spaces of cooperation has been in the spotlight of many academics working on territorial cooperation units. ‘Soft’ spaces concepts, in this context, have been introduced in the pursuit of capturing the reality of cooperation practices, marked by continuous attempts to promote new policy scales, initially through the device of fuzzy boundaries. Nevertheless, despite the necessity to address interests beyond existing rigid administrative boundaries through cooperation, issues related to financial power, infrastructure coordination and investment, ecological and environmental concerns, among others, are situated within hierarchical structures of government and governance. Within such a challenging context - where interests overlap but administrative units do not - the interaction of actors in these areas often remains weak. The study focuses on exploring cooperation motives and implications arising among stakeholders in these ‘soft’ spaces of interaction. Herein, two main case studies serve as a first basis to formulate the propositions upon which the research operates. The first case study has been carried out in the Dutch-German border area, focusing on a common natural linkage and asset such as the Rhine river. While coordination between different sectoral policies exists in both sides of the border, different social context, planning modes and different legal and political conditions make the implementation of common projects a challenge. This case study aims on defining points of interests that can foster the cooperation between governmental institutions and, more specifically, the main challenges that non-governmental actors face while trying to cooperate due to cultural differences and institutional set-up in a ‘soft’ territorial cooperation. The second case study analyzes the Karelia cross-border cooperation programme and its activity under the theoretical framework of ‘soft’ spaces, exploring the processes through which it overcomes the administrative and political boundaries of the Finnish-Russian ‘hard borders’. The ability of these cross-border areas to cooperate may appear to conflict with the geopolitical context in which they are embedded. The historical path, however, reveals a process where conflicts over changes of borders and political scenarios coexisted with the sharing of spatial identities and development challenges. The study demonstrates how stakeholders are motivated both by functional needs of cooperation towards regional development, as well as desires to change existent practices in the Russian side. Thus, it is argued that the cross-border cooperation program constitutes a soft space in-between regional, national and supranational levels, as well as an enabler of other soft spaces in the local cross-border level. In both cases the research investigates ways in which governmental institutions and bureaucratic planning procedures influence the interaction between interested stakeholders from both sides of the border. Through informal and semi-formal processes of negotiation employed by several relevant actors, the regions attempt to overcome the clashes between local, national and supranational political and administrative discourses. We see our research as highly relevant to the Urban governance track where we want to give our contribution on what we consider as functional territorial cooperation in a global scene with overlapping administrative boundaries and interests. Furthermore, our empirical research can be an added value to discussions on new urban governance systems and the necessity to shift to soft and more flexible decision making powers, to mobilize interested stakeholders coming from different levels of governance, sectors and territories.
Presenters
SH
Sindi Haxhija
Research And Project Assistant, ISOCARP Institute
Integrated Metropolitan Governance Framework for the GCC Future MetropolisView Abstract
Full Paper 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM (Europe/Amsterdam) 2019/09/10 07:30:00 UTC - 2019/09/10 09:00:00 UTC
Integrated Metropolitan Governance Framework for the GCC Future Metropolis Khaled Abdellatif Urban Planning Consultant, Giza, Egypt, khaled.latif@hotmail.com ABSTRACT The GCC cities have been witnessing continues changes in its governance systems to cope with the post oil era. Recently the GCC governments have allocated multibillion US dollars to finance major infrastructure and transit projects in most of the major cities. As a result, transit oriented development initiatives and intensive real estate projects around metro stations have taken place without formulating an integrated governance mechanism that would steer the growth of the TODs and eventually shape the GCC metropolises Due to gap between the current GCC urban governance systems and the future of its newly born metropolitan areas, this paper will examine and tackle various patterns, problems and challenges of the current urban governance system, to reach to the optimum scenarios for governing the future GCC metropolis Accordingly, a comparison and a historical analysis of the existing urban governance systems will be covered in this paper supported by political, spatial, economic, demographical analysis to produce an integrated metropolitan governance framework for the GCC future metropolis The paper suggests several roads maps to govern the metropolitan areas and metropolitanize the major GCC settlements on the short, medium and long terms. In addition, it answers the following questions; how to move from traditional municipal urban governance to metropolitan one? What are the required economic, social and cultural transformation and restructuring programs to support a smooth transition in the governance system? Why is it the right time to develop the metropolitan governance framework for the GCC metropolis? How will the framework guide the smooth transition towards transit metropolitan governance? The outcomes of this paper will provide a road map for the municipal leaders and urban development authorities to formulate a specific governance framework to steer the future metropolis.
Presenters Khaled Abdellatif
Middle East Urban Planning Team Leader, AREP
Associate Professor Urban Planning
,
Faculty of Society and Design, Bond University
assistant professor
,
University Ion Mincu, Bucharest
Director-urbanist / Lecturer
,
MB Mash studio / Kaunas University of Technology Institute of Environmental Engineering
Research and project assistant
,
ISOCARP Institute
Middle East Urban Planning Team Leader
,
AREP
No moderator for this session!
Mr Khaled Abdellatif
Middle East Urban Planning Team Leader
,
AREP
 Teti Argo
Lecturer, researcher
,
KK PWD ITB
Ms Jennilee Kohima
Lecturer
,
Namibia University of Science and Technology / Namibia Institute of Town and Regional Planners
Mr Eric Huybrechts
Manager of International Affairs
,
Institut d'aménagement et urbanisme Ile-de-France
Partner
,
KB Strelka
+11 more attendees. View All

Notes

No notes added.
Program Navigator